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Jun 5
In the relays 4x1 or the 4x4 you want to have extention when passing the baton.
The incoming runner wants their arm to be fully extended as well as the outgoing runner who also has their arms raised high enough for the incoming runner to see and pass it to.
Having this extension will save time in any race (among other things): 
milliseconds (to overall second) in the 4x1 
seconds in the 4x4
As well many do not understand that the 4x4 does require a run out as well. You cannot go from standing to grabbing the baton and just sprinting. Yes we know the incoming runner is tired but remember it is their job to get it to you and in your hands.

The outgoing runner should have both feet facing forward so that you are fluid when you are ready to run. 
You want to “see” the baton before running away however as this is not a blind handoff like the 4x1. 
If you are truly professional you may be able to pull off  sprinting and then looking back
most runner will “see” the baton however to be certain that they are going to receive is from their teammate. That their teammate isn’t so fatigued that you must slow down or stop to retrieve the baton.
You also do not want to run so fast that you make your teammate run more then a 400.
Unlike the 4x1 I feel there is a lot more chance for you to analyze your runner and how they are running to better judge your initial takeoff and after.

In the relays 4x1 or the 4x4 you want to have extention when passing the baton.

  • The incoming runner wants their arm to be fully extended as well as the outgoing runner who also has their arms raised high enough for the incoming runner to see and pass it to.
  • Having this extension will save time in any race (among other things): 
  1. milliseconds (to overall second) in the 4x1 
  2. seconds in the 4x4

As well many do not understand that the 4x4 does require a run out as well. You cannot go from standing to grabbing the baton and just sprinting. Yes we know the incoming runner is tired but remember it is their job to get it to you and in your hands.

  • The outgoing runner should have both feet facing forward so that you are fluid when you are ready to run. 
  • You want to “see” the baton before running away however as this is not a blind handoff like the 4x1. 
  • If you are truly professional you may be able to pull off  sprinting and then looking back
  1. most runner will “see” the baton however to be certain that they are going to receive is from their teammate. That their teammate isn’t so fatigued that you must slow down or stop to retrieve the baton.
  2. You also do not want to run so fast that you make your teammate run more then a 400.

Unlike the 4x1 I feel there is a lot more chance for you to analyze your runner and how they are running to better judge your initial takeoff and after.